Drug Schedule

Elimination Guideline Changes 2019

PLEASE NOTE that the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) new edition of the CPMA Elimination Guidelines, originally planned for March, is POSTPONED until further notice.

The following is a summary of the changes, sorted into five categories:

  1. Substances completely removed from the guidelines:
  • These substances have been removed because no Health Canada approved product is available or veterinary use of the substance is no longer recommended;
  • These substances remain prohibited under the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations;
  • Testing of official samples for the presence of these substances will continue;
  • Guidance on elimination will no longer be provided; and
  • Use of any of these substances, including in compounded form, may result in a positive test.

 

Acetaminophen Fenoterol Phenothiazine
Aminocaproic acid Floctafenine Piroxicam
Carbazochrome Flurbiprofen Reserpine
Chloroprocaine Ibuprofen Salmeterol
Chloropheniramine Indapamide Sulindac
Chlorpromazine Indomethacin Tenoxicam
Cromoglycate Meclofenamic acid Tiaprofenic acid
Diflunisal Mefenamic acid Tripelennamine
Dyphylline Nedocromil Vedaprofen
Ergonovine Oxaprozin Zompirac
Ethacrynic acid Pentazocine  
Etodolac Pentoxifylline  

 

  1. Substances with some doses and routes of administration removed from the guidelines:
  • Testing of official samples for the presence of these substances will be based ONLY on the doses and routes included in the guidelines;
  • No elimination guidelines will be provided for doses and routes contained in previous editions of the guidelines; and
  • Use of doses and routes for any of the substances that are not included in the guidelines may result in a positive test.

 

Drug Change
Dembrexine Removal of guidance for single administration
Diclofenac Removal of guidance for oral use
Ephedrine Removal of guidance for 300 mg oral dose
Flunixin Removal of guidance for oral and intramuscular use
Guaifenesin Removal of guidance for oral use
Hydrochlorothiazide Removal of guidance for intravenous use
Hyocine butylbromide Removal of guidance for oral use
Mepivacaine Removal of guidance for intra-articular use
Penicillin G procaine Removal of guidance for oral and topical uses
Phenylbutazone Removal of guidance for 3g oral regimen and both 3g IV doses
Salicylic acid Removal of guidance for 3.35g and 8.38g topical doses
Trichlormethiazide Removal of guidance for intravenous use

 

  1. Substances with modified elimination guidelines (some doses and routes):
  • Testing of official samples for the presence of these substances will be based on the elimination guidelines included in the new edition of the guidelines; and
  • Use of any of these substances outside the published elimination guidelines may result in a positive test.

 

Drug Change
Clenbuterol Elimination guidance extended from 7 days to 21 days
Dantrolene Increase from 1g oral/single dose/36 h to 1.5g oral/single dose/48 h
Isoflupredone Decrease intramuscular dose from 24 mg to 20 mg
Phenylbutazone Elimination guidance for 2g doses extended from 48 h to 96 h
Pyrilamine Elimination guidance for 750 mg oral dose extended from 36 h to 48 h
Triamcinolone acetonide Elimination guidance for intra-articular use extended from 6 days to 10 days
Trichlormethiazide Elimination guidance for oral and intramuscular doses all extended to 48 h

 

  1. Substances added to the 2019 edition of the guidelines:

 

Drug Change
Cetirizine (1) 200 mg oral/single dose/72 h
Clodronate (2) 720 mg intramuscular/single dose/30 days
Fluticasone 2 mg aerosol/twice daily for 7 days/24 h
Fluticasone/Salmeterol 2.5 mg & 250 µg aerosol/twice daily for 7 days/24 h
Ipratropium bromide 0.18 mg aerosol/once daily for 3 days/24 h

 

(1) Note that concurrent administration of cetirizine and oral ivermectin will significantly increase the elimination time of cetirizine.

(2) Applies to horses 4 years of age and older. For more details, see CPMA Industry Notification dated May 31, 2018, “Addition of clodronate and tiludronate to the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations.”

 

  1. Substances with some doses and routes added to the 2019 edition of the guidelines:

 

Drug Change
Dexamethasone 20 mg intramuscular/single dose/48 h
Isoflupredone 10 mg intra-articular/single dose/ 6 days
Triamcinolone acetonide 10 mg topical/single dose/24 h
Triamcinolone acetonide 10 mg intramuscular/single dose/10 days

 

The CPMA strongly recommends that your veterinarian be consulted on any decision to administer any supplement or medication to a horse.

Schedule of Prohibited Drugs

There is a 2016 Elimination Guideline Book available in the HBPA office with updated information on withdrawl times. Please pick up your copy for reference. Recent additions to the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs include:

  • Buprenorphine – May 20, 2015
  • Telmisartan -August 27, 2014
  • Robenacoxib -12 Apr 12
  • Dexmedetomidine – 12 Apr 12
  • Ramipril
  • Imidapril
  • Levamisole
  • Ethanol
  • And a quantative limit for furosemide
  • (EIPH Program only)
Glaucine

The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) would like to let horsepersons in Canada know that although glaucine continues to be classified as prohibited substance under the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations, the CPMA has taken steps to differentiate glaucine abuse from environmental exposure. Glaucine is a natural substance produced by several species of plants, including the tulip poplar tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), which is native to eastern North America. While glaucine has also been recognized as a cough suppressant and an anti-inflammatory that is a weak painkiller, it is not approved for use by Health Canada in humans or animals. Glaucine is prohibited by many horse racing jurisdictions, including by the CPMA, because it is not an approved medication and because of its potential for abuse.

Subsequent to positive tests for glaucine in the United States that were later linked to environmental exposure, horsepersons have expressed concern that a similar situation could arise in Canada. In order to prevent this type of situation, the CPMA has adjusted its testing protocols for glaucine.

There are steps, however, that horsepersons can take to reduce or eliminate their horse’s environmental exposure to glaucine. The CPMA recommends working with suppliers of wood shavings to ensure that material is not sourced from tulip poplar trees or other glaucine-producing plants. In addition, do not administer any products to your horse that may contain glaucine.

Should you have any questions or concerns regarding this matter, please do not hesitate to contact CPMA at cpmawebacpm@agr.gc.ca or by calling 1-800-268-8835.

Sincerely,
Steve Suttie

Important Notification Clenbuterol (September 1, 2015)

SUBJECT: Changes to the elimination guideline for CLENBUTEROL

This memo is to inform the horse racing industry of upcoming changes to the elimination guideline for CLENBUTEROL.

Specifically:
The current elimination guideline for the 0.40 mg oral dose given twice daily for 5 days of clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) contained in the 2011 edition of the Schedule of Drugs booklet will be increased from 72 hours to 168 hours (7 days).

CPMA is temporarily removing the elimination guideline for the 0.30 mg intravenous singleadm inistration until further studies are completed.

The 0.32 mg oral single administration will no longer have an elimination guideline.
These changes will come into effect on September 1, 2015.

Ractopamine in Feedstuffs (August 18, 2015)

This memo is further to our notices to industry on February 14 and November 3, 2014, on the subject of ractopamine in feedstuffs wherein we reminded race horse owners and trainers that it remains their responsibility to obtain horse feed and supplements that are free from substances that may trigger a positive test such as ractopamine.

Please be advised that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has published a list of commercial feed facilities enrolled in the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification Program. Race horse trainers and owners may wish to obtain their feed from facilities that have been designated as Type A which are those commercial facilities (feed mills and feed retail outlets) that manufacture, handle and/or distribute only feeds that do not contain ractopamine. They have never manufactured and/or distributed mixed feeds containing ractopamine (including trucking) or have followed the protocols established by CFIA to clean-up their facility.

The list, along with information regarding the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification Program can be viewed at the following link.  Please note that this list is being updated as new facilities enroll.

Should you have any questions, please contact the CPMA at 1-800-268-8835, or by email at: cpmawebacpm@agr.gc.ca.

Important Notification Firocoxib (Feb 9, 2013)

The CPMA is recommending the following withdrawl guideline:

14 days for the Oral administration of 57mg once daily for 5 days.

As of April 1, 2013 official samples will be tested for Firocoxib according to this guideline, and any confirmed detection will be called positive according to Section 165 of the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations.

Implementation of cobalt testing under the canadian pari-mutuel agency’s equine drug control program

The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. It should be noted that cobalt testing in Canada will move from provincial oversight to the CPMA under its official Equine Drug Control Program as of May 1, 2017.
 
The CPMA would also like to advise the horse racing industry that the quantitative threshold for cobalt testing will decrease from 50 ng/mL to 25 ng/mL in blood and that a new threshold of 100 ng/mL will be implemented in urine. These thresholds are published in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations.
 
 
The CPMA would like to remind industry participants to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian.
 
Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA.

Lasix

To place a horse on Lasix;

  1. Make a photo copy of the front of the registration papers.
  2. Complete a E.I.P.H Certification Application (can be obtained from the HBPA office or downloaded from our site or from the wall folder in the Race Office.)
  3. Complete the form, attach the copy of the front of the registration papers and take it to the HBPA office.
  4. The HBPA will add your horse to the active Lasix list then forward the completed form to the Commission Vet for acknowledgement.
  5. The horse can be entered to race immediately. There is no longer a7 Clear Days wait from the date the Commission Vet signs the E.I.P.H Certification Application Form 1.

If you have any horses that run on lasix, but have not run in Manitobabefore, they need to be registered on Manitoba Lasix Program.

You will need;

  • To know where your horse last ran on Lasix – Canada or the USA
  • Make a copy of the front of the registration papers
  • Complete a E.I.P.H Certification Application (can be obtained from the HBPA office or downloaded from our site or from the wall folder in the Race Office.)
  • Complete the form, attach the copy of the front of the registration papers and take it to the HBPA office.
  • The HBPA will add your horse to the active Lasix list then forward the completed form to the Commission Vet for acknowledgement.
  • The HBPA will forward the completed form to the Commission Vet for Acknowledgement.
Important Notification Anabolic Steroids (January 30, 2009)

CPMA will be testing for boldenone, nandrolone, stanozolol and testosterone as of June 1, 2009.  Any graded stakes races occurring before that date will be tested for anabolic steroids.

Water based products, single dose – 30 days
Oil based products, single dose – 45 days
All product, multiple doses – minimum of 60 days after the last dose.

Please note that testing for non-veterrinary approved anabolic steroids is currently in place and that positives for those drugs might occur at any time.

Has your Horse been treated with Penicillin G Procaine?

Failure to comply with these procedures could result in a positive test.

Under certain conditions, quantitative analysis of a blood sample may be used as the basis for classification of a positive or negative with respect to procaine resulting from administration of penicillin G procaine products.

These conditions include:

The last administration of a product containing penicillin G procaine, at a dose up to 6 million IU, occurs at least 48 hours before the scheduled post time of the race for which the horse is entered.  Dosages above 6 million IU may require a longer withdrawal than 48 hours.

Approximate Detection Limits:

 425 Hours (17.7 days) Intra Muscular
60 Hours (2.5 days) Oral
48 Hours (2 days) Topical
See the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency Schedule of Drugs 2006 for more information.

(It is stressed that these results are presented as guidelines only and should not be construed as absolute for every horse to which this drug is administered)
Please follow this procedure before your horse runs if your horse has been treated with Penicillin G Procaine.

  • Pick up a “Request for Quantitative Limit Analysis” form from the Test Barn.  The Chief Test Inspector or any of the Test Inspectors should be able to help you.  They are present in the test barn one hour prior to first post.
  • Complete the form and deliver it to the Federally Authorized Test Inspectors in the Test Barn at least ½ hour (30 minutes) before the scheduled post time of the race you are entered in.
  • Bring $85.00 cash or cheque to the test barn if your horse is called to test.

The authorized Racing Forensics employees, contracted by the Federal Government – CPMA will draw the sample.